Welcome

Welcome

Welcome

This digital cultural heritage application (DCHA) on the 1916 Rising is the final project of a MSc in Applied Digital Media at Griffith College Dublin. It presents a redefined story of that revolution through rarely-seen pictures and witness statements.

Easter1916.ie wishes to thank Kilmainham Gaol, the National Library of Ireland, the National Museum of Ireland and the Military Archives at Cathal Brugha Barracks for permission to reproduce some of their images from the Rising.
Message from Taoiseach
Enda Kenny...

Ireland in 1916

Ireland in 1916

Ireland in 1916

Ireland was part of the United Kingdom in 1916. The country was ruled day-to-day by a British administration, based in Dublin.

But as Home Rule was shelved after the declaration of WWI, a new nationalism was sweeping Ireland which was both cultural and anarchic.

First came a political divide, then a revolution erupted on the heels of a literary renaissance. It would eventually pave the way for a bitterly fought for Irish Free State.Read more...

The Rising

The Rising

The Rising

The Easter Rising lasted just seven anarchic days yet it is marked as one of the most tumultuous and significant events in Irish history.

Sixteen men associated with leading this revolution were executed within weeks. Hundreds were killed and thousands more arrested and interned at jails in England and Wales. The Rising left iconic buildings in Dublin’s city centre razed to the ground with British rule in Ireland in a state of irreconcilable civil and political chaos.Read more...

The People

The People

The People

This section profiles the characters who set the stage for the Easter Rising. From the seven signatories of the Proclamation of Independence to the political leaders who struggled to contain a fevered nationalist revolution, we record the roles and actions of the main figures. Those at the forefront of the dramatic events of Easter week almost 100 years ago tell a remarkable story fired by passion but filled with bloodshed.

There are remarkable characters too on the fringes of the insurrection, such as the pacifist Francis Sheehy-Skeffington (pictured) who was murdered in the Dublin suburbs.Read more...

The Places

The Places

The Places

Some fascinating buildings such as the Dublin Bread Company (pictured right) didn’t survive the Easter Rising. Others are now shopping centres and burstling office blocks.

The leaders of the insurrection had gambled on the British not using artillery in Dublin city centre, but the sight of the Helga on the Liffey with her guns trained on Liberty Hall quickly vanquished those thoughts early on Easter week, 1916. In quelling the Rising, the British forces left a fiery trail of destruction in Ireland’s capital — as damages ran into the millions as new political powers faced the daunting challenge of rebuilding a nation.Read more...

Gallery

Gallery

Gallery

The pictures that survived the Easter Rising tell their own story of a city under siege. These galleries record what happened through the photographic evidence of institutions such as Kilmainham Gaol, the National Library of Ireland, and the National Museum of Ireland at Collins Barracks.

Some of the pictures are rare, others never seen before — but all evoke a myriad of emotions documenting a momentous time in Irish history. The picture here, for example, shows British forces setting up a machine gun on a Dublin street as locals look on, seemingly impassive.Read more...

Social Media
Explore

The 1916 Easter Rising and the War of Independence that followed transformed the political landscape in Ireland. You can explore the events leading up to 1916, the Insurrection itself and its aftermath through the lessons and activities provided in the Primary and Secondary sections.

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