Overview

Overview

Sackville Street

As the first World War raged in Europe, Dublin was also crossing the Rubicon. At the end of a tumultuous Easter week, damage to 200 city centre buildings was estimated at £3m. Around O’Connell Street — then Sackville Street — an area of 27,000 square yards of prime retail space was devastated. Many city centre buildings didn’t survive the 1916 battleground. Others now tell a remarkable story in the formation of modern Ireland. Explore Dublin's key Rising locations with our interactive map, and read the A-Z of places to gain an insight into the drama of life in a guerilla battleground of a city centre rebellion.Read more...

A-Z of Places

A-Z of Places

Sackville Street

ESB has head offices at Clanwilliam House, scene of one of the insurrection’s most bloody battles. Kilmainham Gaol — where the leaders were executed — is a thriving nationalist museum run by the Office of Public Works, and one of Dublin’s busiest tourist attractions. Other buildings are derelict, or are at the centre of planning and development debates. As of summer 2011, relatives of the Easter Rising leaders were in discussions with the Government about plans to erect a bronze sculpture of the Proclamation in Moore Street.The ongoing campaign aims to preserve the area’s links to the Easter Rising and prevent commercial development. A-Z of Places...

Explore

Explore

Four Courts area

This interactive map lets the user visit the locations that formed the battleground for the Easter Rising in Dublin almost 100 years ago. Scroll the locations, get directions for a walking tour or zoom down to Google's Street View for an ever closer lookGo explore...


Key locations of the Easter Rising in Dublin city centre — click on the map to learn more and explore the scenes