Henry Street

Henry Street

Henry Street
This was the northernmost rebel position during the insurrection. It was one of the first areas to be secured by the Volunteers, extending their line down to the Liffey through Sackville Street. The buildings around here, such as the Coliseum Theatre, were bombarded by artillery and the garrisons were surrounded by raging fires. Henry Street was also the scene of looting during Easter week. The Volunteers and Francis Sheehy-Skeffington were among those trying to stop thieving from local businesses.

“In Henry Street, after broaching whiskey barrels and scooping up and drinking the raw liquor, the drunken looters allowed the contents to run to waste. One individual actually took off his clothes in the street and fitted on a new suit from the window of a fashionable tailor’s shop. Dirty, unkempt women from the slums were seen wearing sealskin coats and costly jewellery which they had just stolen,” wrote John F Boyle in his book The Irish Rebellion of 1916.

The extent of destruction and damages to the area was put at £241,870, out of a total of £2.5m for the whole city, he said.